Posts tagged ‘luise rainer’

TCM Film Festival 2010: Thanks for the memories!

Photographer: John Nowak (C) TURNER CLASSIC MOVIES. A TIME WARNER COMPANY. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

A Star is Born, The Producers, Wild River, Top Hat, Sunset Blvd., Leave Her to Heaven, North by Northwest, The Graduate, Pandora and the Flying Dutchman, The Good the Bad the Ugly, King of Comedy, Metropolis …  Tony Curtis, Eli Wallach, Eve Marie Saint, Martin Landau, Mel Brooks, Nancy Olson, Buck Henry,  Peter Bogdanovich, Leonard Maltin, Luise Rainer,  Ernest Borgnine, Darryl Hickman …

Out of all of the film festivals I have attended, including Sundance, this wass by far the most fun. Not only that, but this is probably the purest celebration of cinema in existence.  Imagine that: a film festival that is truly all about film. No pretentious industry mixers, no celebrity-of-the-moments (who have no intention of going to a screening anyway), no swag tents, no panel discussions about marketing and finance, and best of all, no crappy movies! Instead, the art of film was of serious discussion, its preservation was of paramount importance, its history was respected and celebrated and the men and women who created them were honored. It was a film festival with heart and soul—a beautiful thing to see in Hollywood where such things are hard to come by.

And so to Robert Osborn, Ben Mankiewicz, and everyone who made the TCM Film Festival possible, I say: My mother thanks you. My father thanks you. My sister thanks you. And I thank you.

ph: Edward M. Pio Roda Photographer: Edward M. Pio Roda (C) TURNER CLASSIC MOVIES. A TIME WARNER COMPANY. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

ph: Edward M. Pio Roda Photographer: Edward M. Pio Roda (C) TURNER CLASSIC MOVIES. A TIME WARNER COMPANY. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

ph: John Nowak Photographer: John Nowak (C) TURNER CLASSIC MOVIES. A TIME WARNER COMPANY. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

ph: John Nowak Photographer: John Nowak (C) TURNER CLASSIC MOVIES. A TIME WARNER COMPANY. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Luise Rainer – 100 Years And Counting…

Luise Rainer, 1936

Luise Rainer’s last Academy Award nod was for her role in The Good Earth … in 1938. The beautiful German actress’ first had come the year before opposite William Powell in The Great Ziegfeld. A win that brought about considerable controversy, as she was a rather unknown at the film opened. (The award is justified entirely by the tremulous, heartbreaking scene in which she congratulates the man she loves for his marriage over the phone.)

It was the first time an actor(ess) had ever won a competitive Oscar back to back. (“For my second and third pictures I won Academy Awards,” says Rainer. “Nothing worse could have happened to me.”)

Next week, this grand dame of cinema turns 100. Rainer, along with Joan Fontaine, Olivia DeHavilland, Deanna Durbin and Shirley Temple, is amongst the last surviving leading ladies of 1930s Hollywood.

The actress who strong-armed Hollywood’s studio system (‘By the time I’m 40, you’ll be dead,’ she told Louis B. Mayer) and refused to work on projects she didn’t believe in (something of a problem for any MGM contract player) is still a square-shooting firecracker of a dame, who is acutely aware of her extraordinary past—and the presented opportunities that she herself insists were squandered.

Luise Rainer, 1937

Her recent interview with The Scotman speaks for itself. Read Rainer’s dynamic, illuminating interview here.

Or, take a look at one of her most legendary celluloid moments here.